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  • Meet Minneapolis Grieves Death of Mary Tyler Moore

     
    POSTED February 6, 2017
     

Minneapolis residents have been mourning the death of Mary Tyler Moore since her passing last week on Jan. 25, 2017. She was well known for her 1970s sitcom, The Mary Tyler Moore Show, which helped put Minneapolis on the map.

“The 1970s were a time when IDS Center was rising from the ground, Nicollet Mall was still new, and lots of change was coming to Minneapolis,” says Melvin Tennant president and CEO, Meet Minneapolis. “The Mary Tyler Moore Show, with its images of Minneapolis and frequent references to the city, really brought our growing city onto a national stage.”

Minneapolis Visitor Information is the proud home of the Mary Tyler Moore statue, which TV Land originally placed in Nicollet Mall in 2001. The center is allowing visitors to place flowers near the statue to commemorate Moore’s life.

“Mary Tyler Moore played the most famous TV resident Minneapolis has ever had,” says Tennant. “Mary Richards was a character so many people looked up to for her independence, her humor and her spirit. To have her associated with our city has been an honor over the years.”

For those who would like to visit the statue, Minneapolis Visitor Information is located in CenterPoint Energy Building at 505 Nicollet and is open from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. on weekdays and noon to 5 p.m. on weekends.

1. The building that is now the AAA Four Diamond-rated Kimpton Grand Hotel Minneapolis was originally constructed in 1915 as the Minneapolis Athletic Club—a high-end athletic and business club. The Grand Hotel opened in 2000 after a major renovation, and Kimpton Hotels & Restaurants took over management in 2010 and underwent a full renovation that completed in 2011.

 

Here’s the one question you might want to avoid asking Robbie Harrell when you see one of his sculptures at an event: “Is that real ice?” The CEO of Minnesota Ice Sculptures says his com - pany’s sculptures are so clear and precisely carved that they prompt that question at every event they’re displayed. “Once people realize it really, truly is carved from ice, they’re excited about it,” he says. “There are always lots of selfies with the ice sculpture.”

 

The iconic Grand Hyatt New York in Midtown Manhattan recently debuted a multimillion dollar renovation of its conference level, including 12,000 square feet of meeting space and 18 breakout rooms. Designed by New York City-based interior design and architecture firm Nemaworkshop, the new design reflects the energy of the adjacent Grand Central Terminal and the New York City skyline.