• Book Virtual Team-Building Activities from Local Businesses

     
    POSTED May 19, 2021
     
  • Book Virtual Team-Building Activities from Local Businesses

     
    POSTED May 19, 2021
     
  • Book Virtual Team-Building Activities from Local Businesses

     
    POSTED May 19, 2021
     

Your team may have worn out the Zoom happy hour, but these virtual team-building options offer ways to connect and engage on a whole new level.

Brave New Workshop (BNW)
The team behind America’s longest running comedy theater has been offering virtual event options for years, but its latest offering combats a newer phenomenon—screen fatigue. Designed for groups of 100-plus, BNW’s Take-A-Break sessions pair groups with a facilitator that helps attendees practice mindset shifting tips and tools for tapping joy, resiliency, or innovation, and performs a bit of improv before splitting attendees into breakouts for activities selected specifically for the group. “It’s a chance to break away from the day to day, recharge, and have a good laugh, but they’re also learning what’s happening neurologically when they get stuck in a rut, and actionable steps to break free of that,” says owner John Sweeney.

Way Cool Cooking School
With Way Cool Cooking School’s full range of virtual options, teams can bond by logging on for a hands-on culinary adventure from the safety of their own kitchens. “We really pride ourselves on being able to connect groups by igniting their passion for food,” says corporate chef Mary Matthews. Planners can opt for popular chef-led options like the Virtual Happy Hour (where guests can whip up appetizers and a signature cocktail in sync), dig into nutritious dishes with the Workplace Wellness classes, or work with Way Cool’s team to craft a custom team-building event. Way Cool can accommodate groups of up to 300, but teams of 10-25 are ideal for interactive live cooking classes. Planners can coordinate with the school to order ingredient kits for each guest and send out recipes and directions in advance, allowing attendees enough time to shop for their own ingredients, or mix and match. “We’ve all looked into each other’s home offices, but it’s a fresh, intimate experience to meet up from our kitchens,” says Matthews. “Teams leave with a new energy having connected on this new, more personal level over some of the best simple pleasures, and we love getting to help guide that.”

The Firm MPLS
Planners looking to get their teams moving can tap the pros over at boutique fitness studio The Firm MPLS. The studio launched its own collection of virtual classes, but The Firm’s team can also work with planners to craft a custom professionally-led virtual option. The studio offers classes ranging from boxing and cardio to cycling, but director of client services Greta Ertl recommends activities like yoga, barre or dance and aerobics for a crew logging in from home since the exercises require little to no equipment. One of Ertl’s top pro tips? Have your team spend 10 minutes preparing their space and clearing clutter so guests full present and can avoid distractions when it’s time to get moving.
 

When executed safely, in-person meetings and events are possible. But it’s been tough for meeting planners across the nation, due to differing state-by-state and even county-by-county guidelines. In some areas, meetings and events have returned a while ago, but for others, it’s hard to imagine what planning a meeting would be like.

 

In the wake of a total global crisis, the Meet Minneapolis team got to work. 

Connecting the Community

Last summer, as communities across the state reeled, the CVB launched the “We Need Us!” campaign as a rally cry and reminder on the importance of supporting the businesses that make Minneapolis so unique.

“It really came from this question of, ‘How can we support our community that’s hurting in so many ways and make locals feel comfortable making those choices?’” says senior vice president of destination branding & strategy Courtney Ries.

 

Over the years, any corporate event planner can admit to spending countless hours researching the perfect venue or vendors for their gatherings. After attending or hosting hundreds of events, New York-based Daphne Hoppenot was no stranger to this research and was frustrated by its repetitive nature. However, it was planning her wedding in 2018 that pushed her to realize the lack of resources in the corporate events market compared to the wedding industry, and set out to see if other meetings and events professionals were struggling with the same problem.