• Find Hidden Gems at Spaces that Aren’t Primarily Event Venues

     Out-of-the-Ordinary Options for Events

     
    FROM THE Summer 2018 ISSUE
     

    Tattersall Distilling’s serves cocktails in an industrial-chic setting.

  • Find Hidden Gems at Spaces that Aren’t Primarily Event Venues

     Out-of-the-Ordinary Options for Events

     
    FROM THE Summer 2018 ISSUE
     

    Projects in Person’s workspace boasts the original hexagon floors and vaulted tin ceiling.

  • Find Hidden Gems at Spaces that Aren’t Primarily Event Venues

     Out-of-the-Ordinary Options for Events

     
    FROM THE Summer 2018 ISSUE
     

    Cambria Gallery on 7th’s private conference room looks out at the streets of downtown Minneapolis.

  • Find Hidden Gems at Spaces that Aren’t Primarily Event Venues

     Out-of-the-Ordinary Options for Events

     
    FROM THE Summer 2018 ISSUE
     

    Golden Rule’s quaint exterior.

  • Find Hidden Gems at Spaces that Aren’t Primarily Event Venues

     Out-of-the-Ordinary Options for Events

     
    FROM THE Summer 2018 ISSUE
     

    Inside Golden Rule.

  • Find Hidden Gems at Spaces that Aren’t Primarily Event Venues

     Out-of-the-Ordinary Options for Events

     
    FROM THE Summer 2018 ISSUE
     

    Tattersall Distilling is a prime spot for social gatherings.

There is no shortage of event venues in Minnesota, but after a while, you get the itch to try something diff erent, something no one would expect.

For that, you have to think creatively to fi nd places neither you nor your attendees have ever been. That means dreaming up places that don’t primarily serve as venues—places where normally you would distill vodka, peruse marble countertops, shop for the latest in fashion or hop in on a DIY project. The following venues double as event venues that will entertain and awe your guests.

Projects in Person (PIP); Hopkins

Projects in Person started just like many other DIY projects—Pinterest. 

Jill Miller, the space’s owner, found herself pinning projects she planned to do on her house, but then never went through with them. She sifted through so many ideas, and only executed a select few, which she called her “Pinterest in person projects.” The endless pinning and less executing got her thinking. 

“I thought: Why isn’t there a place where you can go where you don’t have to sort through thousands of blog tutorials, where someone can leave you only the sexy part of DIY—the part where you get to build it?” says Miller. “I just wanted a place where it was more hands-on with a lot of project diversity.”

So, she came up with Projects in Person (PIP), a DIY workshop in Hopkins that comes up with the projects, materials and instructions—it’s perfect for those looking to participate in something creative but can’t come up with an idea or fully execute it themselves. It takes out all the research and keeps the actual fun part of the DIY project—following through on it. 

Miller started renting out the 1,900-squarefoot space late last year, which has space for 100 reception-style and 45 seated, and features the building’s original hexagon floors and a vaulted tin ceiling.

“I didn’t go into the business thinking I’d have a venue to rent, but once I landed this space, I thought it’s selfish for me to only use this for my own workshops,” she says. “It’s been really fun at each event to see how it has been transformed for that specific idea. I can’t wait to see what’s next and how the space takes shape.”

While Miller’s projects are now on a grander scale, they still come from the original source of inspiration: Pinterest. Some things never change. 

Cambria Gallery on 7th; Minneapolis

When you walk into Cambria Gallery on 7th, you feel like you’re walking into someone’s (extremely elegant) home. There are marble floors, loft-like ceilings, floor-to-ceiling windows, pristine stone countertops and chandeliers. Add to that a downtown Minneapolis location, and you’ve got the perfect intimate event space.

“Offering our space for private events gives us the ability to create new relationships in the community here in Minneapolis and the home and design industry,” says Brittany Evans, gallery manager. “It also gives us the opportunity to showcase our state-of-the-art product to consumers who have never heard of Cambria.”

The family-owned, 18-year-old natural stone surface producer boasts the most extensive quartz palette in the world. Its primary purpose is a source of inspiration for homeowners and professionals looking to install Cambria quartz in their home. When not acting as a gallery, the 4,200-square-foot space can accommodate up to 250 guests with a private conference room that can seat 10. 

Hosting events at Cambria is a boon not only for planners, providing them with a unique backdrop, but also for the gallery itself. It gives potential customers exposure to the gallery when they might not have visited otherwise. In the future, if they’re looking for stone countertops or other products, they’ll likely think of Cambria.

“We want the hosts to have a unique space to have their event and give them a Cambria experience from beginning to end,” says Evans. “When consumers visit the space, even if they are not in need of a countertop, they leave with Cambria being top of mind.”

Golden Rule and Workshop; Excelsior

Golden Rule started out as a shop and gallery, but eventually expanded to include an event space once its art openings and popup shops became popular. Hosting events at the Excelsior-based space was the natural next step. 

The farmhouse-style, white clapboard Golden Rule has two floors. The first brightand-airy floor houses a shop (which sells apparel, bags, art and more from mostly American artisans) and gallery. On the loftlike second floor is the Workshop where small private events take place, which can hold 24 seated and 30-plus for a more casual event. The second floor is also used for photo shoots for family, bridal and even fashion photography. A full kitchen is on-site. 

The bonus of hosting an event at the Workshop is that the décor of the space means you don’t need to worry about decorating it yourself. “Our space is meant to be aesthetically pleasing, Instagrammable and very lightly styled,” says Erin Duininck, owner. “There is generally no real need to bring in décor beyond floral.” 

Tattersall Distilling; Minneapolis 

Prior to 2015, Minnesota distilleries could sample products at their distillery, but they could not sell cocktails or drinks in any form, meaning they could only serve what they produced and so couldn’t host anyone at the space.

But then Minnesota changed its laws. And thank goodness for that, because we were blessed with the cocktail room at Tattersall Distilling that features about 50 drinks on its menu at any given time and has a portfolio of 30 different spirits. It’s pretty much guaranteed that your attendees will find at least one thing on the menu they like. 

Before Minnesota changed the law, small distilleries didn’t really exist. It wasn’t financially accessible for most people. While a few have popped up since the law has changed, the concept is still a rarity, adding an extra element of uniqueness to the 115-year-old space.

“We thought we could add a unique twist especially with the cocktail room,” says John Kreidler, owner. “There was really nothing like it at the time and there are still very few who do make a variety of spirits.”

Most events take place on Mondays and Tuesdays when Tattersall is closed so that the distillery is open to the public as much as possible. It can hold 95 seated and 120 with an extra 70 on the outdoor patio reception-style. 

“This space is more unique, more authentic,” says Kreidler. “Most event spaces are created pretty simple; it’s very focused on what it’s for. Tattersall is a more unique experience.” 

When Minneapolis won the bid to host Super Bowl LII back in May 2014, the city and its people got to work. By the time the Eagles defeated the Patriots on Feb. 4, 2018, in front of a crowd of 67,612, more than 150 Super Bowl-related parties and events took place, 1,055,000 people attended the 10-day fan festival and 1.4 million people visited the Mall of America. The next day, Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport waved good-bye to a record-breaking 61,000 visitors, and the people who worked tirelessly to pull off the event breathed a collective sigh of relief.