• Gettysburg Reporting High Tourism Numbers

     
    POSTED December 29, 2015
     

The number of overnight stays in Adams County, Pa., through October, is more than 4.1 percent higher than the same timeframe in 2014, according to the Smith Travel Research report which measures hotel occupancy, average daily rates and revenue generated through participating lodging properties.

Lodging is more than 11,000 room nights ahead of 2013—the year the community celebrated the 150th Anniversary of the Battle of Gettysburg and the Gettysburg Address.

 

“The anniversary year was not the pinnacle of tourism in Adams County, Pa.,” says Norris Flowers, President of Destination Gettysburg. “It was the beginning to a new era of tourism, and we’re seeing the success of that right now.”

Soon after the landmark event, Destination Gettysburg launched a different marketing approach, focusing on experiences outside of the Civil War and highlight the region’s culinary tourism, shopping, outdoor recreation and other ways for families and younger visitors to enjoy the area.

 

In 2015, through October, more than 393,000 room nights have been reserved, generating nearly $42 million among the hotels that participate in the study of overnight lodging. The average daily rate in 2015 is $106.50, more than $3 higher than 2014.

“These lodging numbers are positive encouragement that the marketing we have implemented is working,” said Flowers.

Explore Minnesota Tourism is accepting nominations for the agency’s tourism awards through Jan. 10, 2023. The awards honor people, marketing campaigns, and other initiatives that promote Minnesota as a destination.

To be considered for an award, a form must be submitted for each nomination. Explore Minnesota Tourism requests specific details about each nomination, i.e., goals, results, return on investment figures, accomplishments, etc. Supporting documents and creative elements help the Explore Minnesota Awards Committee score each submission.

 

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