Grasp Strong Communication Skills

  • Grasp Strong Communication Skills

     
    POSTED December 4, 2015
     

Communication—be it face-to-face, over the phone, via email or any other version—is and always will be a crucial skillset both in your career and your personal life. Thus, understanding the ways in which to communicate best is crucial. Below, find four signs that prove you need to improve upon the vital skill of communication.

  • Avoiding certain topics. Fear of controversy is common among many people, but it’s something that needs to be faced head on—everyone has a different viewpoint and problems won’t be solved either with silence or passive aggression. Learn to share information and tell the truth without the fear of conflict. This will help you build trust and credibility with your coworkers.
  • Losing control of your emotions. Everyone has emotions—happiness, anger, sadness, you name it. But you can’t overreact to every situation; people will learn to avoid you, and it will be tough to be taken seriously. Work on controlling your emotions to maintain your equilibrium in any situation.
  • Confusion of change through those around you. If those in your personal and professional life complain they don’t know what going on or why something is happening, it’s likely you’re not doing a good job of communicating. Strive to keep people updated with need-to-know information.
  • Not understanding bad news. When you receive bad news last minute or realize people are hiding information from you, it could be because you’re a bad listener. Focus on others, and don’t be thinking about your response while they are talking. Ask questions and don’t interrupt anyone.  

—Adapted from October 2015 issue of Communication Solutions

Any planner knows that reliable Wi-Fi and networking opportunities are necessary, but here are 10 equally crucial elements for executing successful meetings and events.

1. CLEAR OBJECTIVE Attendees need to know what they’ll gain from the event, and speakers need to know what to prepare for. Once you determine the objective, run all decisions regarding the event through that filter: Do the chosen speakers and breakout session topics all contribute to achieving your event’s purpose?

 

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