• Kindred Resorts & Hotels Adds Five New Properties

     
    POSTED August 25, 2016
     

Kindred Resorts & Hotels has just added five properties to it's roster. Currently, the company has 56 properties; the additions include: Amangani, High Hampton Inn & Country Club, Rancho de los Caballeros, Sea Island and Sun Mountain Lodge.

Each hotel brings a unique environment to the brand. Amangani is a 40-suite retreat that offers discrete, personalized service. It's open December through March and features access to National Parks, yoga and reflexology, hiking, dog sledding, photography tours and more.

High Hampton Inn & Country club has a garden for themed dinners and breakout meetings. Their various spaces can fit anywhere from 15 to 200 people. On an interesting note, guests do not have telephones or TVs in their rooms because all staff encourage guests to unplug and partake in the scenery around them.

Rancho de Los Caballeros opened in 1948 and sits on 20,000 acres of High Sonoran Desert. There is 9,000-square-feet of meeting space and 79 rooms that showcase the ranch resort atmosphere. Sea Island boasts 5 miles of private beach, 16 tennis courts, a beach club, three championship golf courses and more. There is more than 51,000 square feet of indoor and outdoor meeting space. Sun Mountain Lodge has meeting areas that can accommodate up to 300 people, full-service catering for indoor and outdoor events, a private wine cellar and a library for intimate gatherings.

Triton Hospitality Group has acquired The Marquette Hotel, Curio Collection by Hilton in downtown Minneapolis and has appointed Evolution Hospitality as manager of the property. Based in Santa Monica, California, Triton was founded in 2021 by hospitality and investment veterans John Murphy and David Parsky to acquire underperforming hotel assets. 

 

Anchorage is a city like none other—making it a popular choice for hosting meetings and events.

Through the tall windows of the Dena’ina Civic and Convention Center in Anchorage, meeting attendees can gaze out toward Cook Inlet, which stretches all the way to the Gulf of Alaska and toward mountains—some snow-capped—representing several ranges. They may even see an eagle fly by or see one of the 1,500 moose that are said to roam Alaska’s largest city. It’s easy to see why it’s said that Anchorage is a city like none other in the United States.

 

When people gather these days, it’s like long-lost friends reuniting after years away. There’s an enthusiasm that energizes the room; attendees are truly present after months of separation courtesy of COVID-19. The Twin Cities didn’t stand dormant over the past two years, and here’s a recap of projects and openings of interest to the meetings and events industry.

Reactivating landmarks