A unique North Shore team-building experience is now available at Larsmont Cottages in Two Harbors with their Larsmont Center for Strategy and Team Development. “The North Shore really is untapped as a destination for corporate meetings,” says Chuck Paton, general manager of Larsmont Cottages.

The Ropes Challenge Course, a key part of Larsmont’s team-building offerings, was installed in the fall of 2014. Ideal for groups of 25-40, the Ropes Challenge Course takes two-and-a-half to three hours to complete and can be paired with the other team-building opportunities offered by the resort such as an Iron Chef competition, a wine-pairing seminar or a series of Northwoods Olympics challenges. Staff from Larsmont will work with the group to align the team-building experience with the goals or struggles of the organization. “Ultimately it’s about getting teams in the same place, learning more about each other and being vulnerable with each other,” Paton says.

When it’s time to get to work, Larsmont’s private meeting room can hold up to 60 in a function space looking out onto the majestic Lake Superior and is fully equipped with A/V capabilities.

For more than 100 years, the Dayton’s building has been an important piece of Minnesota’s culture and economy as the home to Dayton’s and Macy’s department stores. The department stores served as anchors for the downtown retail and business district. Now, the landmark building at 700 Nicollet in downtown Minneapolis is being reinvented for the 21st century through a $350 million historic redevelopment. 

 

The CDC defines close contact as within six feet or less, for 15 minutes or more with someone who tests positive for COVID-19. At gatherings of many kinds, contact tracing is used to trace the people that someone has come into contact with, before they learn that they have tested positive. This allows the people that the sick person came into contact with to be aware of the situation, and to make health-informed choices. 

 

With restrictions across the country in a state of constant flux, not everyone is ready to jump back into meeting in person. While some planners are eager to get back to “normal,” the long-term adjustment to new protocols and potential risks make some hesitant to gather.

While wearing masks and social distancing can help keep attendees safe, intentional design choices—such as including natureinspired elements and materials and plenty of plants—can also help calm attendees.