• Local Animal Shelter Brings Rescue Dogs to Events

    Puppy Crashers
     
    FROM THE Fall 2017 ISSUE
     

"No pets allowed" is a fairly common regulation, especially in a private event setting. But imagine that event suddenly filled with your favorite four-legged friends. Sound too good to be true? Think again.

Located in Eden Prairie, just steps from the Viking’s training center, Secondhand Hounds (SHH) is an animal rescue and adoption shelter that brings together some of the best things in life: events, parties and, of course, puppies. 

“Our main purpose is to save animals from high kill shelters and put them in foster homes until they find their perfect forever home,” says Rachel Mairose, executive director at SHH. Mairose founded SHH in 2009 after moving to the Twin Cities from St. Louis. Her previous involvement with animal rescue inspired the decision. 

Whether it’s an adoption event, community event or your very own “Puppy Party,” SHH has a variety of options to choose from. It could be a wedding, bachelorette party, birthday or corporate event. Attendees receive 90 minutes of playtime and interaction as well as a chance to learn more about SHH.

“People are much more engaged and excited when there are dogs at an event,” says Mairose. “It spurs conversations, elevates moods and makes people excited to learn.”

Outside of the events, there are plenty of other ways to get involved with SHH. All of the animals are rescues, meaning there is always an opportunity to make a new furry friend a life-long companion. SHH is always seeking applications for fostering, volunteering or adopting. 

When Minneapolis won the bid to host Super Bowl LII back in May 2014, the city and its people got to work. By the time the Eagles defeated the Patriots on Feb. 4, 2018, in front of a crowd of 67,612, more than 150 Super Bowl-related parties and events took place, 1,055,000 people attended the 10-day fan festival and 1.4 million people visited the Mall of America. The next day, Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport waved good-bye to a record-breaking 61,000 visitors, and the people who worked tirelessly to pull off the event breathed a collective sigh of relief.