• Ocean County Tourism Still Going Strong

     
    POSTED October 8, 2015
     

Ocean County’s tourism industry in New Jersey continues to get bigger and bigger. And, according to Joseph H. Vicari, freeholder and chairman, Department of Business Development and Tourism, there’s nowhere to go but up.

 “Tourism is a $4.3 billion industry in Ocean County, but by the end of this year I’m predicting it will be at $4.4 billion,” he says. “Every dollar that tourism brings into the county circulates seven times, providing jobs, paying taxes and strengthening our local economy.”

Reports show this past summer was strong, with visitors prominently visiting the beaches and business Ocean County has to offer.

 “Our number one draw is still our 44 miles of coastline and beaches,” says Vicari. “But people also come for the museums, the farmlands, Six Flags and the Lakewood Blue Claws.”

Those visitors are a boom for local businesses, the vast majority of which are small Mom and Pop stores, restaurants and other establishments. Vicari, who serves as Chairman of the Department of Business Development and Tourism, said he’s worked closely with local businesses, and chambers of commerce to entice more visitors to the county.

But the success doesn’t stop with the coming of fall.

“Our season lasts all year,” says Vicari. “There is always something to do in Ocean County. The fall brings with it such popular events as Chowderfest in Beach Haven, the Decoy and Gunning Show in Tuckerton, pumpkin picking in Plumsted and the Seaside Heights Columbus Day Parade and Italian Festival.”

Explore Minnesota Tourism is accepting nominations for the agency’s tourism awards through Jan. 10, 2023. The awards honor people, marketing campaigns, and other initiatives that promote Minnesota as a destination.

To be considered for an award, a form must be submitted for each nomination. Explore Minnesota Tourism requests specific details about each nomination, i.e., goals, results, return on investment figures, accomplishments, etc. Supporting documents and creative elements help the Explore Minnesota Awards Committee score each submission.

 

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